LUCY FRADKIN
"Arthur Dreams of India" has been selected as a finalist in the portrait competition exhibition at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery (NPG). The exhibition will be run from March 12, 2016 to January 8, 2017. It will then travel to several host museums across the country from February 2017 through June 2018.
I will teach "Mastering the Art of Collage" at the Art Students League October 5-9, 2015 from 1:30-5:00. Please see the Art Students League website for more information.
I will teach "Mastering the Art of Collage" at the Art Students League April 27 - May 1 2015 from 1:30-5:00. Please see the Art Students League website for more information.
"I Wish Would Rain" was purchased by the Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for the Dillard Collection of Art on Paper. "I Wish It Would Rain" along with four other of my works on paper were exhibited at the Museum in 2014 in "Art on Paper: The 43rd Exhibition.
"Arthur Waters The Garden" has been selected as a finalist in the portrait competition exhibition at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery (NPG) from March 23, 2013 through February 23, 2014.

I will be a Visiting Artist at Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Colorado in July 2014.
I will teach a workshop at the Art Student's League in November

Mixed Media Collage Portraits will meet for 2 days, Saturday and Sunday November 3-4, 10 am- 4:30 pm

For more information and to register please visit the Art Student's League website:

http://www.theartstudentsleague.org/Workshops.aspx
Lucy Fradkin Paints Charming Folk-Style Narrative Portraits feature at ArtsObserver.com

Read here http://www.artsobserver.com/2012/04/11/lucy-fradkin-paints-charming-folk-style-narrative-portraits/ or go to Links page for live link
My exhibition Home Is Where The Heart Is was selected as an EDITOR'S CHOICE by ARTSLANT
My exhibition Home Is Where The Heart Is was selected by Art in America online editor's as a show not to be missed.

Read more at http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-opinion/news/2012-03-15/the-lookout-315 or go to Links page for live link
Hyperallergic Review
Read review at http://hyperallergic.com/48647/a-wondrously-naive-universe/

or go to Links Page for live link
I will teach a workshop at the Art Student's League in May 2012

Mixed Media Narrative Collage will meet for 5 days, Monday -Friday, 4:00–7:30 pm; from May 7-11

For more information and to register please visit the Art Student's League website:

http://www.theartstudentsleague.org/Workshops.aspx
My second solo exhibition at the Nancy Margolis Gallery in Chelsea opens to the public on March 1 with an artist reception 6-8 pm.

The exhibition continues through April 7.
I have been awarded a studio at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation in Dumbo Brooklyn for one year starting September, 2011.

I will teach a workshop in July 2011 at Anderson Ranch Aspen, Colorado.
I have been nominated for the Invitational Exhibition of Visual Arts at the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
I have been selected as one of three finalists for a Public Art for Public Schools Sites for Students Commission at Beekman Hill International School. The new school, designed by the award-winning architectural firm SOM, will be in the same complex as the High School of Art and Design. Art Spiegelman and Lawrence Weiner have been selected for Public Art for Public School Commissions in the High School.
Lucy Fradkin, Family Tree opens to the public on Thursday, March 25th 6 -8 pm at the Nancy Margolis Gallery in the Chelsea Art District in Manhattan. The gallery is located at 523 West 25th Street. Ground Floor 212 242.3013. Gallery hours are Tuesday - Saturday 10am - 6pm The exhibition runs through May 1st.
Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant, 2009
Lucy Fradkin's paper-doll-like portraits at Clark Gallery appear simple, but they're packed with personality. Her images of black people -- her Jamaican husband Arthur Simms, or her Brooklyn neighbors in the brilliant "He Was a Plumber, an Electrician, a Carpenter, a Cabinetmaker, a Tiler, a Blacksmith and a Mechanic," featuring a family posing against a red backdrop -- pop off the wall.

It has to do with skin tone and color contrasts; in these works, the darker skin plays joyfully off bright backgrounds. Then Fradkin adds in wild patterns--in "He Was a Plumber...," we see a green summer dress and intricately patterned necklace, a pink dress with white polka dots, a wood-tiled floor. The work becomes almost musical, with filigrees and whispers and hot tones swirling around the straight-backed figures.
-Cate McQuaid, Boston Globe, November 26, 2008
The engaging, full-length portraits created by Lucy Fradkin immediately attract and entice with their rich, deep, luscious palette and intricate, graphic decorative patterns that derive from textiles, rugs, and wallpaper. Her portrait compositions rarely deviate, as she presents friends, acquaintances, and diverse peoples that she meets in a somewhat relaxed, but acutely aware formal frontal format. The figures in her compositions are utterly alert to the presence of a viewer on the other end. They gaze directly out at us and pose somewhat self-consciously in ways that are subconsciously oriented towards specific gender presentations of the self to the outside world. The environment in which Fradkin paints her subjects contains both realistic elements such as intricate wallpaper designs, pictures on a wall and furniture, but it is part fantasy as well. Fradkin chooses not to detract from her subjects by situating them in a realistic space, but removes all but the most necessary of objects and items to delineate the sparest of interior domestic environments or the outdoors. The artist plays with the different spatial elements within the composition, tilting the planes of tables up so we see their surfaces, while flattening out the depth, so that there is no recognizable sense of space or receding background. Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque ushered in this innovative way of looking at space with their Cubist compositions in the early twentieth century. In Fradkin’s portraits, color is also heightened to a theatrical blood red or sometimes acidic, candy green. With another artist, these reductive, eye-popping elements might tilt the portraits towards the cartoon, but Fradkin’s delicate technique, compassion for her subjects, and unerring compositional eye renders her portraits even that much more human and vulnerable. Her deft use of color adds an emotional content to her portraits as it doubles as both a background and as an indicator of mood and possibly culture and ethnicity. Fradkin’s work is utterly contemporary with its stripped down, minimal, highly detailed qualities but it is also firmly rooted in many folk and art historical sources from the ancient to the modern.
One of the most striking aspects about Lucy Fradkin’s portraits is her use of color and decoration in every composition and how these two forces play against her deft utilization of empty, flat space.
-Lisa Hatchadoorian, Curator, Nicolaysen Art Museum, 2008
Adolf and Esther Gottlieb Individual Support Grant, 2007
New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, 2005